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Human remains found in 2,100-year-old shipwreck

Human remains found in 2,100-year-old shipwreck

According to researchers the human remains found on an ancient shipwreck from 2100 years ago will shed some light on the past that was thought to be lost.  The researchers found human remains off the Greek Island of Antikythera in the Aegean Sea and have been studying them at a site in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  Because of the deaths they are not able to determine where they were going or who was on board the ship when it went down.  When they found the site back in 1900, they were able to find some jewels, coins, an astronomical calculator (described as being the first computer), and other artifacts.

DNA from the find could help the historians find out how the crews’ lives were like on the ship.  They are hoping to find out who Pamphilos was – he or she – and how they came to be on the ship – the name was etched on a wine glass that was recovered from the wreckage.  The researchers need to get permission from the Greek Authorities before they can send the DNA samples for more extensive testing.  After they have received this permission, they will be able to tell the ethnicity and geographic origin of the people that were on the ship.  That is if they are able to get enough DNA from the bones – a human skull that still had some teeth attached, some ribs, and an arm and legs.  Some bones still remain embedded in the sea floor and will be removed in the future.  The bones they found were stained with amber red which suggests that they were shackled and leads them to believe that they were slaves.